in “major” databases there is sometimes an ETL (Extract,Transform, Load) tool. as DataFrames are the “commonly” used data structure in Python for similar operations (and analysis), you can perform all three functions. That said, i prefer to only do the ‘E’ and ‘L’ as they are “simply” accomplished by built-in functions. The ‘T’ require me to use a for loop and read each row using a file handler, so it’s more “convenient” for me to manipulate the data once it’s imported.

it’s important to note that determining which dataset to use can involve unconscious/implicit bias. therefore in analysis (and offering insights), you need to consider the source: no matter the prevailing “wisdom”, one needs to distinguish between fact and opinion.

here is the updated GitHub repository:

https://github.com/LinsAbadia/Python/tree/master/DataFrames

the common misnomer is that it’s called Black Fridaybecause it’s when retailers are “back in black” due to all the shopping and sales. for a long time, i also believed this but with some digging found out the actual origin.

apparently, a handful of investors were responsible for the U.S. stock market crashing. this made much more sense to me since ‘Black’ as an adjective doesn’t exactly evoke a “positive” association.

for all intents and purposes, people now have a “good” notion of this day. it’s not only an event in America but the day after Thanksgiving ( it would be interesting to get the Wampanoag tribe’s perspective on this holiday) is a thing in other countries that don’t celebrate the preceding event. it’s just interesting how words/phrases/concepts can take on different meanings based on “popular” usage.

true or not, it still is somewhat appealing for me to think that the evolution of the word “aweful” (now obsolete in spelling terms or in technical speak: deprecated) to “awful”. supposedly, the parents used to describe churches as “full of awe” so , eventually, children had a “negative” experience and it took on the opposite meaning.

on our recent trip to New Zealand, we were told we had to take a gondola to the restaurant. we were quite perplexed when we found out it was on top of a mountain – we thought we had to take a boat and wondered what was next. by default, we were all thinking about the “flat” vessel popularised by the canals of Venice.

it piqued my interest so i Googled the term on my phone. apparently, although not as well known, it can also refer to an alternative mode of transport: an enclosed lift or cable car – which made much more sense!

my son and wife also tried riding the luge down. although we were atop a mountain., there was no snow – instead they took vehicle similar to “bikes” which were also “powered” by gravity.

sometimes, we have pictures in our heads that don’t match the reality.

there are many ways to instantiate a DataFrame but here’a a primer on typical ways to create one.

the DataFrame is the primary data structure in Python for data science. it acts like a spreadsheet or database – it kind of reminds me of the Data Window object in PowerBuilder (it was very convenient for me). And unlike most high-level programming computer languages it didn’t need a “connector” (or driver) like ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity) or JDBC (Java DataBase Connectivity) – you were lucky if there was a “native” one because it performed quicker as there was no need to “translate” stuff – to interact with external databases.

here is my updated GitHub repository:

https://github.com/LinsAbadia/Python/tree/master/DataFrames

today (November 19) is UN World Toilet Day. i know it’s to promote sanitation and health but, with your indulgence, let me “hijack” it to discuss some of my concerns about accessible toilets. it may be crass and gross to most but to me it’s a microcosm of how disability is viewed/treated by society at large: a few do it for the sake of compliance and to merely adhere to the law, while most are well-meaning but “misunderstand” the issues because “designers” have no lived experience (whether personal or ancillary) or lack proper awareness.

doors. some doors are “too” heavy without a spare set of hands. another “pet peeve” of mine is when there is another set of doors: this is extra effort because i’s another “obstacle” and there usually isn’t enough space unless you close the first set. moreover, my wife or son sometimes need to hold the door open for me to get in and out. furthermore, a few open the “wrong” way so that i need to position my walker to the side in order to open it (i always wonder how people with wheelchairs manage).

locks. some people no longer or aren’t imbued with the necessary dexterity to operate locks: i’ve used the facilities a number of times without engaging the locks or spent several minutes to unlock it (and it’s really bad for me as i have claustrophobia and can get terribly anxious).

space. i understand there are costs involved but sometimes i can’t turn and need to exit “backwards”. i also encountered a few that requires you to “park” your mobility aid elsewhere to use the facilities – there was even one with a wall separating a toilet. in such cramped quarters, how can people using wheelchairs safely transfer to the toilet itself.

handrails. there are a few with “misplaced” handrails or items (usually toilet paper) placed atop where you are safely meant to grab. i’ve even encountered some without any handrails – they just assume that everyone will just sit down but you may need to hold on to something to adjust your seating or help you get up.

toilet paper dispensers. i’ve yet to find one that’s easy to use. i can understand the intention but you have to be adequately nimble to get any TP: sometimes your fingers need to navigate a “small” opening to either get the first square or because after you tear a few off it goes back “in”. These are often sharp and is problematic for me as i’ve got co-ordination issues and occasionally involuntarily movements – i can’t even imagine someone with “severe” movement disorders.

lights. a few have them have the switches behind the door. automated ones are usually handy but i find they don’t detect you when you’re on the throne and cut-out after a certain time – i have to “furiously” wave my arms to get the light back on and even tried moving various body parts to no avail.

smell. unfortunately, i’ve got a keen sense of smell and most do double duty as parents’ rooms with nappy (diapers to you American-English speakers) and when there is something in the bin (or trash can) it can get a bit “whiffy”. Alternatively, the bowl isn’t flushed because it was hard to do by a previous user; they forgot or don’t care; the flushing mechanism doesn’t work or doesn’t function well enough – whatever the case may be, the result is the same: it stinks.

i’m sure there are other things i’ve missed as the topic gets me worked up. on second thought, hotel bathrooms need a seperate entry as my family and i like to travel a lot. i need to say this because the country by far with, IMHO, the “best” accessible toilets is by far Australia.

there are even chairs in a few toilets. you might ask: isn’t this a good thing? yes and no. for people that need support, it’s wonderful thing but it’s a subliminal indication that persons with disabilities can’t or shouldn’t participate in the community independently.

it’s complicated

November 3, 2019

i put a draft of QuickSort implemented in Python – admittedly, i’m open to suggestions to further improve it and any other examples that will help understanding. Like my experiences before, it was “difficult” for me to find a “simple” explanation online.  Since some programming languages implemented it as part of a standard library, some ICT professional aren’t familiar with its internal workings and don’t bother to learn it.  i’m all for black boxes and abstraction but when trying to master a language it helps to implement fundamentals – this doesn’t only sharpen one’s thinking ( sort – pun intended – of a form of mental gymnastics) but also to familiarise oneself with the intricacies/quirks of a language.

this absence of “simple” resources seem to be due to a number of things.  my direct experience is that it is sometimes due to the attitude and education/training of technical personnel.  some of them just want to feel superior/smarter than the rest of us – their “hang-ups” from school is evident so that they in turn mistreat others that’s why, IMHO, hazing practices persist.  some act, understandably, as “gate-keepers” to try and make this knowledge exclusive in order to protect their jobs (i.e. economic reasons) or status (i.e. social motivations) or both. and while they most are capable enough to understand, they are not clever enough, equipped to, or motivated to (there’s an obvious misalignment of objectives) make these concepts “easily digestible” for others.  the willingness to help masks their hubris or condescension  – a humble brag of sorts. this fact necessitates me to query my own motivations.

while i don’t recall it being discussed (probably due to my specialisation), it may have been covered in passing by a course in my masters, i could no longer remember how it worked exactly before this endeavour.

the updated GitHub repository can be found at:

https://github.com/LinsAbadia/Python/tree/master/Problems/Algorithms

 

i have just got back from medical leave “recently” and have been “out of commission” for the last few days due to a procedure (it should have taken only two days to recuperate but due to my age it took me longer to recover – i’m still not 100%).  Lately, i’ve been “scrambling” to salvage any hope of completing my research degree.

kindly excuse my “radio silence” for the last few (and probably next few) days.