sing

November 6, 2017

 

last week a choir performed this song.  I haven’t heard it in awhile being in OZ but it’s one of my favourite hymns. It made sense that they sung the English version so that most people could understand.

Strangely, the original is by St. Ignatius of Loyola and for some reason my personality clashes with the Jesuits.  The point is (regardless of spirituality), we should always aspire to be more selfless.  I don’t claim to be so inclined but the reminder to be generous is always welcome.

The English lyrics can be found below but I find the Tagalog version more beautiful and expressive.  There are many versions (most of which you can find on YouTube)  but I still prefer the one by the Bukas-Loob Ministry.

To paraphrase St. Augustine:  “Those who sing pray twice.”  A certain person inadvertently was mistaken  when he claimed to originate the saying (having received an Augustinian education I’m reasonably certain).  I’ve grown to be an admirer, who doesn’t like a good redemption story (I think that requires a seperate blog entry).

I may no longer have the ability to do it outwardly but in my mind, I still sing.

PRAYER FOR GENEROSITY (with English lyrics)

Dearest Lord, teach me to be generous
Teach me to serve You as I should
To give and not to count the cost
To fight and not to heed the wounds
To toil and not to seek for rest
To labor and ask not for reward
Save that of knowing that I do Your most holy will

 

PANALANGIN SA PAGIGING (PRAYER FOR GENEROSITY in Tagalog)

Panginoon, turuan Mo akong maging bukas palad
Turuan Mo akong maglingkod sa Iyo
Na magbigay ng ayon sa nararapat
Na walang hinihintay mula sa Iyo

Na makibakang ‘di inaalintana
Mga hirap na dinaranas
Sa tuwina’y magsumikap na hindi humahanap
Ng kapalit na kaginhawahan
Na ‘di naghihintay kundi ang aking mabatid
Na ang loob Mo’y siyang sinusundan

Panginoon, turuan Mo akong maging bukas palad
Turuan Mo akong maglingkod sa Iyo
Na magbigay ng ayon sa nararapat
Na walang hinihintay mula sa Iyo

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worse for wear

October 10, 2017

i won’t lie – I’m bit upset.  Just came from my NeuroPhysio and although my Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) test wasn’t too bad it was the first time I can recall it getting worse. This coupled with my recent falls (of which I rarely did), the return of what seems like the “shaking” of my hands, and my recent battles with anxiety is genuinely concerning to me.

She agrees that it would have been much worse if not for my exercising daily (and I have to do “quite a few”). Improvements have always been unrealistic – our goal was always keeping it from getting worse.  Because the doctors still can’t identify it, there is no timeline I can refer to – it may go downhill rather quickly at any time like it did at the onset before it “stabilsed”.  She gave me additional exercises to see if these help.

I’m naturally pessimistic but stubborn.  It’s not my nature and was raised not to wallow but have learned that I can’t keep everything bottled in like I usually do.  I think I’ve got the right to feel overwhelmed sometimes.  I felt afraid so I cried.  It was cathartic and necessary for me to move on.

trivial pursuit

September 18, 2017

for some reason, I’ve always been interested in trivia.  I’ve always enjoyed reading and browsing the Internet. Among other things, I like watching shows like  Jeopardy!, Adam Ruins Everything, and Food:  Fact or Fiction.  One of my most-liked chefs is Heston Blumenthal as I’m intrigued in how chemistry (although I found it boring in high school – it was my least favourite science subject) can be applied to cooking – another of my hobbies.

But I digress.  I’ve recently been made aware of a Google hack: if you type the words “fun facts” in the search bar, a piece of trivia will be returned.

(dis)like

August 28, 2017

at first, I thought divisiveness was only a by-product of politics and the news media.   Some of us exhibit confirmation bias and (often unknowingly) we seek out echo chambers consistent with our point of view.  Recently, I’ve read a book contrary to some of my inclinations.  That said, it’s constructive to actively listen to counter-arguments. It’s our task to convince and not talk-over someone -my experience is that making people feel dumb or pointing-out that they’ve got “silly” ideas is counter-productive.  As the adage goes, you can disagree without being disagreeable. I’ve always believed you can learn from anyone:  what to do and what not to do.  I subscribe to von Bismark’s thoughts on arguing.  I’m open to hearing differing opinions but still have a ways to go.

I “stumbled” on this segment also calling for “openness” when it comes to literature choices:

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/problem-liking-things-find-relatable/

as time goes by

April 12, 2017

last night a friend (who was also a student at UniMelb and now based in Sydney) had dinner at our house.  It’s been years since we last saw her.  Maybe it was the shared experience but it was a confluence of factors (including our “academic” tendencies and that we didn’t share accommodation).  I’ve got few friends because of my numerous quirks but when you meet someone, you just know if you’ll get along with them.  I’m not that nostalgic but it was good to catch up on “old” times

they might be “giants”

February 23, 2017

Newton coined the expression standing on the shoulder of giants. With the advent of the Internet I think this could be extended by adding goblins and gnomes to giants.

Aside from what to do, I think you can also learn from what NOT to do. Hence the term goblins.  I’ve always felt you can gain from people what to emulate and what to avoid.  Granted some of this may be repetitious but sometimes lessons need to be repeated to ensure they are drilled in thoroughly.

I subscribe to the wisdom of the crowd and individual empowerment.  You can also build upon ideas of people who might not be considered as giants in their field – that’s why I use the term gnome to highlight the contrast.  An idea may be good despite its origin.  Admittedly, we are more likely to learn from “experts” (being a teacher in a former life, it would be hypocritical to think otherwise).  That said, we also need to be open and allow cross-pollination from other disciplines or differing opinions.  All ideas must be given a fair chance.

The original quote will always be valid but IMHO it can do with an adaption to our times.

Gordian Knot

August 31, 2015

MOOCs and Universities are tricky.  On one hand you have practicality, on another you have reputation.  There are a lot of opinions out there.  I do not pretend to know a lot but I try to read as much as I can.

Stephen Downes’ website (http://www.downes.ca) is quite a resource.  You can read his blog or subscribe to his daily online learning e-mail newsletter if this is something that piques your interest

This article is also readable:

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/8/data-technology-and-the-great-unbundling-of-higher-education

In a country with a developing economy such as the Philippines, Internet bandwidth’s a real issue.  That said, the abundance of mobile phones poses a “different” opportunity.  To paraphrase the book “The Spirituality of Imperfection”, don’t take MOOCs verbatim but seek out their intent.

There’s much to ruminate on.