strange bedfellows

March 20, 2017

they recently showed the Theory of Everything on free-to-air tv.  While Stephen Hawking is an inspirational figure, he’s not necessarily aspirational for me.  I’m nowhere near as smart.  We need people we can relate to.  I accomplish things because I’m not dumb and work really hard.

I know Dr. Stephen Strange is fictional but I could weirdly relate more to the film Doctor Strange.  I’m not a surgeon but I guess it had to do with embracing the unexplainable despite bring logical.

Strangely enough in the movie Logan, I could relate to both Professor X and Wolverine –   this was the first time I saw myself in two characters.  Maybe it was their “fall from grace” so atypical of a superhero flick or maybe it’s because I’m such a comic book nerd.

Regardless, we’re all different, relate to certain things, and process things at our own pace.  Despite people’s insistence, a single, magic, silver bullet  “solution” doesn’t always exist.  Some issues are divergent or require multiple things acting in harmony.  Narrowing it to one thing would be great but that isn’t always possible.

they might be “giants”

February 23, 2017

Newton coined the expression standing on the shoulder of giants. With the advent of the Internet I think this could be extended by adding goblins and gnomes to giants.

Aside from what to do, I think you can also learn from what NOT to do. Hence the term goblins.  I’ve always felt you can gain from people what to emulate and what to avoid.  Granted some of this may be repetitious but sometimes lessons need to be repeated to ensure they are drilled in thoroughly.

I subscribe to the wisdom of the crowd and individual empowerment.  You can also build upon ideas of people who might not be considered as giants in their field – that’s why I use the term gnome to highlight the contrast.  An idea may be good despite its origin.  Admittedly, we are more likely to learn from “experts” (being a teacher in a former life, it would be hypocritical to think otherwise).  That said, we also need to be open and allow cross-pollination from other disciplines or differing opinions.  All ideas must be given a fair chance.

The original quote will always be valid but IMHO it can do with an adaption to our times.

patience (is a virtue)

November 29, 2016

we are born with two ears and one mouth – having difficulties speaking has led me to listen more (but that deserves another entry of its own).  Common practice dictates that you should hold off for 24 hours on sending an emotionally (or alcoholic) induced e-mail, text or tweet (much like counting down from 10 or taking long, deep breaths can aid in dissipating excess emotion). If you still think it’s appropriate later on then go for it – I guess making it difficult to type has its perks and writing a post over a few days helps me to reflect and reevaluate more.  Despite my Vulcan-like demeanor, I exhibit more human behavior now. If I still really feel strongly about something, I can blog about it.  That said, my words need to be tempered by the saying: “it’s easier to condemn than to convince.”  Sure, sometimes it’s hubris but at times it’s simply therapy, expression or observation.  This is not a “manifesto” to abstain from commentary, it’s just one should be able to distinguish what one’s true purpose is.  Having a combination of these factors is not necessarily a bad thing:  it’s being conscious of what’s subjective versus objectivity that’s important.  Intentions (and motivations) need to be transparent.

A “wise” editor once told me that everything is political and that being apolitical is a political choice.  I’ve since embraced this tenet – after all, our thinking is not only a function of our genes but also of our experiences.  Sometimes it can look like I’m fence-sitting when I just don’t have enough facts or am considering the nuances – the devil is in the details after all.  The question I ask is how, if at all, does this affect me or my family?  Sure, I’ve got opinions about many things but does it really matter in the grand scheme of thing or is the motivation so that I feel better.

I used to think that it was “simply” a matter of quality over quantity.  But to paraphrase the Pulitzer-prize author, Jennifer Egan, one needs to write regularly, even badly at times, to be able to ultimately write well.  In this vein, I pour my writing into one document – not everything makes it to be published under my blog; not everything is meant to be shared with the rest of the world (some are best left as “inner” dialogue – look at the trouble Homer’s gotten into throughout the years).   That said, perfect can be the enemy of good so it can also be helpful to get something out there and not “oversanitise” or self-censor everything.  From experience, some comments can be constructively critical and useful for refining your thoughts and others you need to consider with a grain of salt (public spaces can be a great boon but also a huge bane at the same time – wisdom of the crowd vs. trolls and haters).

the good book

January 22, 2015

there are several books that I think my son should read (that I’ve read in one form or another.)  Not just because I think it’s good for him academically, help him read more advanced texts. or help him understand his roots better but, ultimately, assist in making himself better.  This is by no means an exhaustive list or in any particular order:

a.) Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterisimo (the English versions, of course – I’m not that cruel)

b.) Nation for Our Children

c.) The Spirituality of Imperfection

d.) Social Things (this doesn’t read as a text book)

e.) The Forgetting Room (One of his names is partly inspired by the protagonist)

f.) The Death Gate Cycle series (it’s a total of 7 books – the first 4 are independent followed by a trilogy that relates the “worlds”)

While books in themselves, don’t have all the answers – they’re a tool that helps us think more about things.

 

brave new world

April 27, 2014

in a world of blogs, it was curious (and simultaneously heartening)  to encounter a young person taking journalism – albeit part of a double major.  The web is a double-edged sword: although it has granted a voice to those that would normally be able to participates, it has at times deteriorated into a shouting match and its accuracy is often questioned – look at Wikipedia.  There are pros and cons of anonymity and the wisdom of the crowd.  As in most things, balance is the key.

Rather than the traditional claim of a gate-keeping  role, the press needs to exemplify integrity and fact-checking without the red tape associated with it. It is hard yakka in a world where it is difficult to distinguish the wheat from the chaff – I guess it is wise to consider the source.

purpose of being

March 30, 2014

this blog is personal – it is not meant to advance a specific purpose.  I write to enhance my skill and as a form of therapy: to share and express my feelings. It is there to help clarify  and develop my thoughts on various subjects. On occasion, there is a rare insight but that is more of light bulb moment rather an attempt to put forth a formal case – sometimes there is a point but that is not the sole intention of the online journal.

ironic

December 25, 2013

neuroscientists don’t believe in the split of functionality of both hemispheres of the brain: logic and creativity require both parts.  It’s ironic that the corpus callosum‘s role is to divide AND connect both sides.

One can’t entirely blame humanity for dualism and binary relation – genralisatiion allows us to deal with everyday life. It’s sometimes easier to define a thing as what it’s not.  There’s a bias towards rationale and objectivism – science and history has made it so.  Qualification has it’s place but it’s not the end all and be all.  Like most things, balance is at the root of humanism.

I’ve included a brief animation as a “meme” (and because I think it’s cool):

http://www.thersa.org/events/rsaanimate/animate/rsa-animate-the-divided-brain