i looked into it (but i forgot to note where i got it from) as i was drafting a document and wanted to know the prescription when to fully spell out a number. as a “rule of thumb”, anything less than 10 (or less than multiple digits) merit using the whole word (although some style guides dictate that ten is still a “small” number but i don’t subscribe to this as it’s more cumbersome to generalise). for example, using one instead of the numerical symbol 1.

that said, you may decide to “break” this rule depending on your actual or planned readership. sometimes you need to know when it’s appropriate to break certain rules: just as when abstract painters eschew fundamental or standard techniques.

i’m not sure of “large” negative numbers though – my hunch is that maybe a “modified” rule applies depending on the number of digits. that is the “rule” for writing but, in my experience, different audiences have different expectations: case in point, writing for the web might require a different mandate. what about those containing decimal points? is there an exception for numbers in tables? variances can lead to strife. if you are aware of these (and other) guidelines, kindly share your knowledge…

to “complete” “slicing” DataFrames, i discuss loc and iloc. i think this enough to cover the “basics” of Python. as you know, i will start trying to delve into statistics to a.) further my skills, and b.) see if i can be “useful” to my wife.

i was always planning to tackle “advanced” topics -it was just “accelerated” sooner rather later.

here’s something i “shared” so i can “move on” to statistics :

https://github.com/LinsAbadia/Python/blob/master/DataFrames/LocVIloc.ipynb

That said, i can consider revisiting “past” topics based on feedback.

i was composing something in Word and was confused in which was the right preposition for a reference to a month so i Googled it.

i used to “Google” (i mainly restored my browser tab) “fun facts” daily but eventually had a “technical difficulties” so i abandoned this practice.

for a specific time, you’re supposed to use ‘at’. referring to days and dates merits ‘on’, and for other units ‘in.’

we only had a few days to go to China so we chose Shanghai because of Disney (previously visited by my sister and her family) and my best friend was there (unfortunately, he was reassigned to Thailand before we got there). sadly, we didn’t get a chance to ride the bullet train; or see The Great Wall or the Terracota Army but we enjoyed our stay nonetheless.

we’ve been to most Disneys and the castle at Shanghai was, IMHO, by far was the “best”. not only is it more aesthetically pleasing but you can enter and climb it. we started with a ride exclusive to that park. if there are three or more in your party and you are keen to repeat rides, you may want to consider their concierge service. moreover, it also includes reserved areas for the parade and fireworks.

we saw numerous bridges and canals that day – we were told that waterways were historically significant. on our tours, we were able to visit a “traditional” water village (my wife and son were able to go a gondola ride on the main canal) which was about an hour away from the city by car. as a contrast, we also walked by the river during the day (we saw the Bund and the things around it) and went on a “scenic” cruise that night (we saw the Oriental Pearl Radio & Television Tower with its “renown” spheres illuminated) – my son is into photography so he really enjoyed it.

aside from the aforementioned places, we also visited a “traditional” home – like the gardens we visited it was designed for introspection and thought. room entrances (at least those accessible from the outside) were designed with “hurdles” as ghosts supposedly had no knees – and there were a lot of “zig-zags” as apparitions could only travel in straight “lines” we noticed a lot of rocks in gardens and asked about it – apparently large ones were difficult to gather from the river and was a sign of affluence.

we also went to a silk factory and a pearl producer – they also educated us and not only gave us an opportunity to purchase stuff. what was important was they taught us how to tell if something was authentic or fake.

we also went to two museums (it would have been three if the other one had not closed). not to be aloof, but yes, we are museum people. i noticed a “lot” of paintings (not just at “traditional” repositories such as these) – my theory regarding affinity for calligraphy as the source seemed to be validated by my guide.

i (and my son) enjoy duck so much that my friend (whose tastebuds i trust) sent me this link:

http://www.smartshanghai.com/articles/dining/the-list-5-place-for-peking-duck-in-shanghai

consistent with what my friend said, one of the five “top” duck restaurants had closed as the food scene is really competitive. we managed to book at my friend’s go-to place. i usually don’t name places but i had the “best” duck i ever ate at Quan Ju De and the meal was “cheap”. i learned that it is referred to there as Beijing Duck and not as it’s sometimes known as Peking Duck as this has something to do with the pinyin transliteration (that is, technically it doesn’t really involve a name change). that said, so far our preferred cuisine is Cantonese – which is supposedly the apex of Chinese food according to our guide which isn’t the primary cuisine in Shanghai. what is the saying about Cantonese: they eat everything on land except cars, they eat everything in the sea except boats, and they eat everything in the air except planes. so i’m generally open and will try something first before saying or decide\ing i dislike it – that said, i don’t like everything but i’m more gastronomically”adventurous” than most.

i’m a big coffee drinker but , unsurprisingly, tea was really good there. just as i’m an advocate for beans, loose-leaf is the way to go. we witnessed a “proper” tea ceremony and my wife bought several tins of tea – they even knew how to package it for Australian customs.

i prefer food to shopping but you can’t deny it is world-class. most “luxury” brands have a “major” presence (some have multiple floors and we even went to a mall with only “exclusive” shops. there were even products that were sold only in Shanghai. thankfully, my wife and son only looked.

we wish we had more time to explore the city “fully”.

i did a lot of coding in my time and was introduced to neural networks at school so it wasn’i really a stretch learning Python. i only knew aspects of statistics so it became obvious to me that it was something i had to strengthen to upgrade my data science skills because i had a lot of exposure to programming and a little background on artificial intelligence – let me preface it by saying, it’s been awhile since i’ve “actively” done both and technology has advanced, that said, i’ve been developing a GitHub repository because i believe the expression that says you teach best what you need to learn.

to brush on the basics and truly understand Descriptive Statistics i’m perusing version 2 of the ebook Think Stats: Exploratory Data Analysis by Allen B. Downey. it’s supposedly framed for programmers and better suited for them in learning statistics.

aside from personal growth, my wife (although she’s well versed in machine learning and teaching programming) and her work team are looking at doing some research that may require this. so there’s a greater incentive to study this.

i was at my weekly neurophysio appointment yesterday for first time in 2020. since it was the session of the new year, she asked if i had any goals or specific plans for this year – honestly, nothing came to mind and i hadn’t really thought about it.

she reiterated that my daily exercise routine was meant to improve my stability and balance. and that “putting it together” in a regular walk outside might be beneficial for me. i wouldn’t impose on my wife as she is tired from work and does household chores. although i exercise everyday, the last thing i want to do is go out exercise and do more of it.

so it might be more practical to arrange an NDIS-funded carer to take me for a walk. i sometimes already do this indoors in our “long” hallway at home so you might be perplexed. i’m not very confident walking alone on uneven surfaces. i was given an “assignment” before to walk around our house – case in point, i only tried this once as aside from it was slow going my walker kept getting “stuck”.

she thought walking outside may be beneficial (she was even willing to write the NDIS a letter to support an increased funding for this activity). i did some digging and i think it’s prudent to arrange a “trial” first using my current plan before “committing”to it in full.

i watched Juliet Naked it wasn’t that different from a “formulaic” romantic comedy – it’s just i found the dialogue quite “pithy”.i liked the comedy stylings of Chris O’ Dowd in The IT Crowd (maybe since i used to work in tech i could relate). strangely, it’s his choice of “dramatic” roles i find appealing: this film and The State of the Union, a limited television series.

it sort of reminds me of the movie: High Fidelity ( this was a very rare instance where i enjoyed the film aside from the book by Nick Bantock – who happens to be one of my favourite authors).

it’s probably the writing which i like in both films – i’m a sucker for “good” dialogue. there’s a line in the film which struck me, paraphrasing it was to the effect that art is not for the artist as water isn’t for the plumber – effectively elevating the “beholder” in the power dynamic wrought equation.

generally, i tend to like some of the roles that Ethan Hawke accepts: Gattaca, Boyhood, Great Expectations, Training Day, Reality Bites, and Dead Poets Society, It seems “foolish” to expect i’d like all his movies.

if you’re doing nothing, it’s an “alright” flick to watch.